Updated on 2022/12/01

写真a

 
IIDA Midori
 
Organization
Sado Island Center for Ecological Sustainability . Associate Professor
Title
Associate Professor
External link

Degree

  • 博士 (農学) ( 2010.3   東京大学 )

  • 修士 (農学) ( 2005.3   東京大学 )

  • 学士 (水産学) ( 2003.3   北里大学 )

Research Interests

  • amphidromy

  • Gobioidei

  • island

  • diadromy

  • aquatic

  • ecology

  • fish

  • migration

Research Areas

  • Life Science / Ecology and environment

  • Life Science / Aquatic bioproduction science

Research History (researchmap)

  • Niigata University   Marine Biological Station, Sado Island Center for Ecological Sustainability   Associate Professor

    2019.4

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  • Niigata University   Sado Marine Biological Station, Faculty of Science   Associate Professor

    2019.3

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  • Niigata University   Sado Marine Biological Station, Faculty of Science   Assistant Professor

    2015.4 - 2019.2

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  • University of the Ryukyus   Tropical Biosphere Research Center   Postdoctoral Researcher

    2014.4 - 2015.3

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  • Museum national d'Histoire Naturelle de Paris   Postdoctoral Researcher

    2013.10 - 2014.2

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  • Museum national d'Histoire Naturelle de Paris   Postdoctoral Researcher

    2012.9 - 2013.2

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  • University of the Ryukyus   Faculty of Science   JSPS Postdoctoral Fellow

    2011.4 - 2014.3

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  • The University of Tokyo   Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute   Postdoctoral Researcher

    2010.7 - 2011.3

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  • The University of Tokyo   Postdoctoral Researcher

    2010.4 - 2010.6

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Research History

  • Niigata University   Sado Island Center for Ecological Sustainability   Associate Professor

    2019.4

  • Niigata University   Faculty of Science Department of Science   Associate Professor

    2019.3

  • Niigata University   Faculty of Science Marine Biological Station   Assistant Professor

    2015.4 - 2019.2

Education

  • The University of Tokyo   Agriculture and Life Sciences   Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Doctor Course

    2005.4 - 2010.3

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  • The University of Tokyo   Agriculture and Life Sciences   Department of Aquatic Bioscience, Master Course

    2003.4 - 2005.3

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  • Kitasato University   Faculty of Fisheries

    1999.4 - 2003.3

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Professional Memberships

Committee Memberships

  •   Shinano-gawa River system committee  

    2020   

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  • Niigata Prefecture   environmental effect judging committee  

    2019   

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    Committee type:Municipal

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  • Ecological Society of Japan   Handling editor, Ecological Research  

    2019   

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    Committee type:Academic society

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Papers

  • Migratory pattern and larval duration of an amphidromous goby, Rhinogobius nagoyae, at Sado Island, in northern Japan Reviewed

    IIDA, M, K. KIDO, K. SHIRAI

    Marine and Freshwater Research   2021

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    Authorship:Lead author, Corresponding author   Language:English  

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  • Specific gravity and migratory patterns of amphidromous gobioid fish from Okinawa Island, Japan Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Masashi Kondo, Helene Tabouret, Ken Maeda, Christophe Pecheyran, Atsushi Hagiwara, Philippe Keith, Katsunori Tachihara

    JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY   486   160 - 169   2017.1

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    Amphidromy is a diadromous life history pattem where fish spawn in freshwater, and their larvae drift downstream to the sea; the larvae develop in marine environments then migrate back in rivers to grow and reproduce. Two amphidromous types with different life history characteristics, such as egg and larval sizes, exist. To understand the ecology and early life history of amphidromous gobioid fish, six species from Okinawa Island were selected two large egg-type species (Rhinogobius similis and Tridentiger kuroiwae) and four small egg-type species (Stiphodon percnopterygionus, Stenogobius sp., Sicyopterus lagocephalus, and Eleotris acanthopoma). The migratory pattern of four of these species was confirmed using otolith Sr:Ca and Ba:Ca ratios combined with water chemistry analysis. Although these species showed amphidromous migratory patterns, the timing of migration from estuarine to freshwater habitats was species-specific. The large egg-type, R. similis, showed three different migratory patterns: a long marine larval phase with a relatively fast migration from estuarine to freshwater habitats, a short marine larval phase with a relatively fast migration, and a gradual migration. Similar patterns of a long and fast migration or a gradual migration were seen in T. kuroiwae; however, the two small egg type species, Sri. percnopterygionus and Stenogobius sp., showed rapid migration to freshwater after entering the river. To estimate larval ecology in the sea, ontogenetic changes in specific gravity (SG) were examined in all species. The SG was measured day and night for 1-5 days until settlement in R. similis and T. kuroiwae, and until 10 days after hatching in the other species. The SG of all species ranged from 1.0138 to 1.0488, and varied among ontogenetic stages and between day and night and species. Larval SG was relatively similar between R. similis and T. kuroiwae, with low SG in the early stages and high SG after yolk absorption. During the late larval stages and until settlement, T. kuroiwae showed diel changes in SG, with higher SG during the day, whereas R. similis had a relatively constant pattern. The diel changes of T. kuroiwae larvae suggest different activity during the day and at night (e.g. diel vertical migration). In the four small egg-type species, SG was high at hatching and decreased thereafter, not showing large diel changes. The results suggest that sympatric amphidromous gobioid species have various early life histories that may be influenced by several larval traits, including SG. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2016.09.011

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  • Oceanic larval duration and recruitment mechanism of the amphidromous fish Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobioidei: Sicydiinae) Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    REGIONAL STUDIES IN MARINE SCIENCE   1   25 - 33   2015.3

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    Amphidromy is a type of diadromous life history that includes migrations between the ocean and freshwater. The amphidromous fish Sicyopterus japonicus spends its early life in the ocean and then migrates back to estuaries as post-larvae, but little is known about their transition between marine and freshwater habitats. To understand their oceanic larval duration and recruitment mechanism, an intensive three-year survey was conducted in the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan. Their general amphidromous migratory patterns were confirmed using otolith Sr:Ca ratios that all showed an oceanic larval phase. Newly recruited S. japonicus post-larvae were sampled daily in the estuary from March to September 2006, 2007 and 2008. Post-larvae were collected mainly from April to June (spring to early summer), but the number of post-larvae collected varied among years (N = 12,766 in 2006, 372 in 2007 and 942 in 2008). No clear relationships were observed between environmental factors, such as moon phase and water temperature, and the number of post-larvae collected each day, but post-larvae were observed to recruit with flood tides (flood tide transport). Standard lengths of collected post-larvae ranged 22.5-34.0 mm, and the oceanic larval durations estimated by their otoliths ranged from 176 to 283 days (mean: 219 days). Although there were no clear trends in length, body weight, condition factor and larval duration during each recruitment season, most post-larvae recruited at a constant size of approximately 27 mm. Our results indicated that amphidromous S. japonicus have a limited recruitment season and a generally constant body size when they recruit. Their recruitment season was shorter than that of similar species inhabiting tropical and subtropical regions, which might be an adaptation to seasonality of the temperate region. It is possible that body size is a more important factor affecting the timing of recruitment of S. japonicus post-larvae than environmental factors. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.rsma.2015.03.001

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  • Riverine life history of the amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobiidae: Sicydiinae) in the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OF FISHES   96 ( 5 )   645 - 660   2013.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:SPRINGER  

    To understand the riverine life history of the amphidromous goby, Sicyopterus japonicus, studies were conducted in the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan. They were distributed from 3 to 23 km upstream from the river mouth, and abundance was higher in the middle reaches than in the upper and lower reaches. Fish were not observed in rapids during winter, suggesting a seasonal change of habitat. Body length ranged from 24 to 120 mm SL. Both females and males ranged from 1 to 6 years old, and males had larger asymptotic length than females. Condition factor showed two peaks in July and November, which appeared to correspond to the spawning season and preparation for over wintering. Gonad somatic index increased in summer with a peak in August indicating a summertime spawning season that was confirmed by collections of the newly hatched larvae migrating downstream. Eggs of 0.5 mm diameter were attached to stones and newly hatched larvae made continuous vertical movements of sinking and upward swimming and the distance of each movement was longer in freshwater than in seawater. The newly hatched larvae were collected at nighttime (19:00-24:00) mainly in August. Those larvae were very small (mean: 1.4 mm TL) with a yolk sac and no eye pigmentation. Low wintertime temperatures are likely an important determinant of the spawning and recruitment seasons and seasonal changes of activity of this species that lives at much higher latitudes than all other species of the subfamily.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10641-012-0055-9

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  • Survival and behavioral characteristics of amphidromous goby larvae of Sicyopterus japonicus (Tanaka, 1909) during their downstream migration Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Yoshiaki Yamada, Clara Lord, Philippe Keith, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL MARINE BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY   383 ( 1 )   17 - 22   2010.1

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV  

    To understand the ecology and environmental tolerances of newly hatched larvae of the amphidromous fish Sicyopterus japonicus during their downstream migration, the salinity tolerance of eggs, 0-15 day old larvae, and adults, and the temperature tolerance, specific gravity and phototaxis of hatched larvae were examined. Tolerances of adults were measured as survival after a 24 h challenge in freshwater (FW), brackish water (1/3 SW) and seawater (SW). The survival rate of adult S. japonicus was 100% in FW and 1/3 SW, while none survived in SW. Hatching success of eggs (30 eggs each) was significantly higher in FW (mean: 73%) and 1/3 SW (73%) than in SW (19%). Tolerance of newly hatched larvae to salinity and temperature was investigated in different combinations of salinities (FW, 1/3 SW and SW) and temperatures (18, 23 and 28 degrees C). Larval survival was significantly different in each salinity and temperature. Survival rate was significantly higher in 1/3 SW than in FW and higher in SW than in FW at 23 degrees C and 28 degrees C. At the latter part of the experiment, there was no survival in FW and at 28 degrees C. Survival was higher in lower temperatures, but larval development did not occur in FW. Specific gravity of newly hatched larvae was 1.036 at 28 degrees C and 1.034 at 23 degrees C. When exposed to a light source on one side of an aquarium, larval distribution was not affected. Our results indicated larval S. japonicus are more adapted to brackish water and seawater than freshwater, while the adults and eggs are more adapted to freshwater and brackish water than seawater. This is consistent with their amphidromous life history with growth and spawning occurring in freshwater and the larval stage utilizing marine habitats. (C) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2009.11.006

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  • Life History Characteristics of a Sicydiinae Goby in Japan, Compared with Its Relatives and Other Amphidromous Fishes Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    CHALLENGES FOR DIADROMOUS FISHES IN A DYNAMIC GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT   69   355 - 373   2009

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (international conference proceedings)   Publisher:AMER FISHERIES SOC  

    Sicyopterus japonicus is unique because it is the only temperate amphidromous goby of the subfamily Sicydiinae. Life history and migration characteristics of S. japonicus, including seasonal changes of condition factor, spawning season, hatching size, oceanic larval duration, recruitment season, and size at recruitment, were examined in the temperate region of western Japan and were compared with those of other Sicydiinae species, all of which inhabit the tropics and subtropics. The condition factor varied seasonally, with peaks in July and November. The spawning season of S. japonicus ranged front July to September, with a peak in July-August, and was shorter than that of other species that normally spawn from 7 to 12 months/year. The hatching size (1.5 mm total length) was similar to other Sicydiinae, but oceanic larval duration (range: 173-253 d) was longer than most other species. The long larval duration and single annual reproduction period Suggest that it is adapted to long-distance oceanic dispersal. The recruitment season (about 4 months) is the shortest known among the Sicydiinae, but its size at river entry (mean: 26.3 mm standard length) was similar to other species. The shorter reproductive and recruitment seasons for S. japonicus probably indicate that its migration strategy is determined by seasonal changes in the temperate region. Sicydiinae species have larger Clutch sizes and smaller hatching sizes compared to other temperate amphidromous families such as the Galaxiidae, Osmeridae, and Cottidae. Sicydiinae species have no nondiadromous forms, suggesting that they may have a migration strategy with a high oceanic dependency that facilitates oceanic dispersion.

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  • A record of Tetraroge nigra (Tetrarogidae) from Iriomote Island, southern Japan, with notes on its ecological aspects Reviewed

    SATO, M, H. KOBAYASHI, M. IIDA, K. SHIRAI, K. SASAKI

    Ichthyological Research   68   207 - 213   2021.1

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  • Reproductive seasonality and the gonadal maturation of silver pomfret Pampus argenteus in the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh Reviewed

    Fatema Akhter, Md. Moudud Islam, Midori Iida, Md. Mahiuddin Zahangir

    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom   100 ( 7 )   1155 - 1161   2020.11

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Cambridge University Press (CUP)  

    <title>Abstract</title>The silver pomfret (<italic>Pampus argenteus</italic>) is one of the most commercially important marine fish species in the Bay of Bengal, Indian Ocean. However, detailed information on the reproductive biology of silver pomfret is limited for the Bay of Bengal, Bangladesh. To understand their reproductive biology, especially the gonadal developmental cycle and spawning season, a total of 373 individuals were collected monthly from February 2016 to January 2018 and examined. The total length (TL) and weight (TW) of <italic>P. argenteus</italic> ranged from 18.82–35.73 cm and 89.26–617.60 g, respectively. The highest gonadosomatic index (GSI) values were observed from April–June with a second (smaller) peak in October. The highest oocyte diameter was observed in May (630.50 ± 96.70 μm), when the fish reached full maturity, and the lowest was observed in July (35.10 ± 7.12 μm), when new eggs began their development for the next spawning season. The maximum number of eggs in the ovary were found in the yolk granule stage in May with a number of post-ovulatory follicles, which indicated that the ovaries developed to a peak leading up to the spawning season. A number of spermatids were also seen in males in April–June along with females. From these detailed observations, it may be concluded that <italic>P. argenteus</italic> shows two spawning peaks, in May–June and October. This observation will be helpful for the artificial breeding, sustainable management and conservation of this species in the study area.

    DOI: 10.1017/s0025315420000922

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  • Life history and instream distribution of the endangered goby Acanthogobius insularis from Okinawa-jima Island, Japan Reviewed

    KUNISHIMA Taiga, IWAMOTO Risa, IIDA Midori, TACHIHARA Katsunori

    Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom   99 ( 1 )   229 - 237   2019

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    DOI: 10.1017/S0025315417002053

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  • Fate of Worn-Out Functional Teeth in the Upper Jaw Dentition of Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobioidei: Sicydiinae) During Tooth Replacement Reviewed

    Noriyuki Sahara, Keita Moriyama, Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe

    ANATOMICAL RECORD-ADVANCES IN INTEGRATIVE ANATOMY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY   301 ( 1 )   111 - 124   2018.1

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY  

    Mochizuki and Fukui (Jpn J Ichthyol 30 () 27-36) studied the development and replacement of the upper jaw teeth in a Japanese fish species, Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobioidei: Sicydiinae), and they reported that worn-out functional teeth in the upper jaw were not shed outside the skin but were taken into the soft tissue of the upper jaw and completely resorbed there. To date, however, this phenomenon appears poorly documented. Furthermore, the mechanism for the resorption of these teeth remains to be determined. In this study, we examined this phenomenon by using 3D microcomputed tomography (m-CT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and various techniques of light (LM) and electron (EM) microcopy. This study demonstrated that the upper jaw dentition of this fish was more or less simultaneously replaced with the replacement occurring during short time periods and that the lingual movement of the replacement teeth to the functional tooth position advanced simultaneously in a given row. Furthermore, our study also revealed that many worn-out functional teeth were engulfed by the oral epithelium, invaginated into the lingual shallow ditch of the premaxilla, and were resorbed/degraded completely by numerous foreign body giant cells rather than by odontoclasts during periods of at least three intervals of tooth replacement. The complete resorption/degradation of worn-out functional teeth in the soft tissue of the upper jaw suggests the possibility of the reuse of their components (minerals such as Ca and P, including Fe) for rapid and successional production of new replacement teeth in the upper jaw of adult S. japonicus. Anat Rec, 2017. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 301:111-124, 2018. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    DOI: 10.1002/ar.23685

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  • Downstream migration of newly-hatched ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) in the Tien Yen River of northern Vietnam Reviewed

    Hau Duc Tran, Midori Iida, Ken Maeda

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OF FISHES   100 ( 10 )   1329 - 1341   2017.10

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    The ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) is an annual, amphidromous, plecoglossid fish, distributed in Vietnam, China, Taiwan, Korea, and Japan. To date, ayu have been found only in two rivers in northern Vietnam, where little is known about their life history. The Tien Yen River is believed to be the most southwestern habitat for this species. To determine whether newly hatched ayu larvae drift and to understand their downstream migration, intensive surveys were conducted in the Tien Yen River from October to March of 2013-2016. In total, 529 drifting ayu larvae were collected from four of six sampling stations along the river. Thus, ayu reproduction has been confirmed in this river for the first time, where only adult fish had been found previously. However, we did not successfully collect larvae in the eastern branch of the river, which has a hydroelectric dam, suggesting that ayu do not inhabit this branch or else do not reproduce there. The presence of drifting larvae in the western branch from mid-December to late January implies that they spawn from late November to mid-January. Drifting larvae were captured primarily at night, but peak occurrences varied depending upon the day and the sampling station. With the range of body sizes and variable diel abundance patterns, ayu in the Tien Yen River probably employ multiple spawning grounds. This study provides fundamental life history data for the vulnerable ayu populations in northern Vietnam.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10641-017-0646-6

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  • Swimming depth and behaviour of newly recruiting post-larvae of Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobioidei: Sicydiinae) in the estuary of the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    CYBIUM   41 ( 2 )   101 - 105   2017.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:SOC FRANCAISE D ICHTYOLOGIE  

    Recruitment from the sea to freshwater is a turning point in the life history of amphidromous fish. The amphidromous gobioid subfamily Sicydiinae is distributed widely in Indo-Pacific regions. To understand their ecology at recruitment, which is poorly known for this subfamily, underwater observations of recruiting post-larvae of Sicyopterus japonicus were conducted and their swimming depth was measured in the estuary of the Ota River of Wakayama, Japan. During 16 observation periods from April to July in 2006,2007 and 2008, newly recruiting post-larvae were observed swimming in shoals in the middle layer of the lower half of the water column near the river banks in the upper area of study site and in the upper half of the water column near the river mouth. Although the estuary appears to be a temporary transit area for newly recruiting post-larvae, it may be an important place for them to adapt to their later benthic herbivorous life in freshwater.

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  • Ecology of Sicyopterus japonicus Invited

    Midori IIDA

    Aquabiology   38 ( 4 )   370 - 378   2016.8

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    Language:Japanese   Publisher:生物研究社  

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  • Time and order of eruption of first functional teeth in the upper jaw of post-larval life of Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobiidiae: Sicydiinae) during cranial metamorphosis at the time of river recruitment Reviewed

    Noriyuki Sahara, Keita Moriyama, Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe

    ARCHIVES OF ORAL BIOLOGY   66   8 - 14   2016.6

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD  

    Objective: The present study was aimed at elucidating the time and order of eruption of first functional teeth in the upper jaw of post-larval life of Sicyopterus japonicus (S. japonicus) during cranial metamorphosis at the time of river recruitment.
    Design: Fishes were caught at the post-larval stage at a river mouth and maintained for 7 days in a water tank. Each of 10 specimens was evaluated every day for 7 days by using microcomputed tomography, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy with peculiar attention to the development of the upper jaw teeth.
    Results: Fishes caught at the river mouth were mostly transparent, with a rostral terminal mouth, and no teeth could be found in either the upper or lower jaw. At 2 days after collection, the mouth position changed from terminal to subterminal, resulting from a change in head shape. The initial eruption of first functional teeth was detected at the anterior two-thirds region of each upper jaw. These teeth erupted in adjacent positions, most had a tricuspid crown, and they represented miniature versions of adult teeth. At 5 days, the position of the mouth became further relocated from terminal rostral to ventral. The number of erupted teeth increased, followed by spreading of them anteriorly and posteriorly. At 7 days, they formed a single row of close-set tricuspid teeth along the entire length of each upper jaw.
    Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that even under laboratory conditions a rapid and drastic cranial metamorphosis took place within a week after the time of collection of post-larval S. japonicus from a river. The eruption of first functional teeth in the upper jaw of S. japonicus, which teeth are adapted to scraping algae off the substrate, was initially detected at 2 days after collection, and first functional dentition of the upper jaw was set up within 7 days after it. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI: 10.1016/j.archoralbio.2016.02.005

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  • Effect of waterfalls on fluvial fish distribution and landlocked Rhinogobius brunneus populations on Yakushima Island, Japan Reviewed

    Yuichi Kano, Midori Iida, Kenshi Tetsuka, Toshihiro Saitoh, Fumihiro Kato, Tatsuro Sato, Shin Nishida

    Ichthyological Research   61 ( 4 )   305 - 316   2014.11

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    © 2014, The Ichthyological Society of Japan. The distribution of fluvial fish was surveyed at 55 sites on Yakushima Island, Japan, which has precipitous mountains and waterfalls (below- or no-waterfall sites: 31; above-waterfall sites: 24). Eleven diadromous and one river resident (introduced Oncorhynchus masou masou) species were found, but absolutely no fish were detected at the 18 above-waterfall sites. Statistical analyses revealed that the presence of waterfalls (> 5 m in height) below the sites had a significant negative effect on fish distribution, suggesting that waterfalls prevent migration of diadromous fishes. We found Rhinogobius brunneus populations above high waterfalls such as Nunobiki Falls (50 m) and Ohko Falls (88 m). Otolith Sr:Ca ratios and mitochondrial DNA (cyt-b region) were examined to determine the migratory history and genetic properties of these populations; the Sr:Ca ratios indicated that the populations had a landlocked life cycle, whereas the genetic endemism/isolation of landlocked populations was unexpectedly absent. There is no clear explanation for this phenomenon, but fairly infrequent individuals of nonlandlocked type might have migrated beyond the waterfalls with their sucker-like organ and mated with landlocked populations, disrupting the genetic isolation of landlocked populations.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10228-014-0400-4

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    Other Link: http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0294-1985

  • Tropical and temperate freshwater amphidromy: a comparison between life history characteristics of Sicydiinae, ayu, sculpins and galaxiids Reviewed

    Shun Watanabe, Midori Iida, Clara Lord, Philippe Keith, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    REVIEWS IN FISH BIOLOGY AND FISHERIES   24 ( 1 )   1 - 14   2014.3

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    Amphidromy is a distinctive form of diadromy, but differences in the life histories of tropical and temperate amphidromous fishes suggest that there are two types of freshwater amphidromy. The life histories of Sicydiinae gobies, ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis), Japanese sculpins (Cottus) and galaxiids (Galaxiidae), suggest that the Sicydiinae are representatives of tropical freshwater amphidromy, whereas ayu, sculpins and galaxiids are representatives of temperate freshwater amphidromy. The Sicydiine larval stage may be required to occur in the ocean for all species, but ayu, sculpins and galaxiids have landlocked or fluvial forms with larvae that do not need to enter the ocean for larval feeding and growth. This suggests that Sicydiine larvae have a high oceanic dependency whereas ayu, sculpins and galaxiid larvae have a low oceanic dependency. Freshwater amphidromous fish in tropical and temperate zones appear to have developed two different strategies in the evolution of their life histories. It is likely that the evolutionary direction of the larval stage of tropical amphidromy is to remain in the sea and that of temperate amphidromy is towards having the ability to remain in freshwater if needed. Tropical and temperate amphidromy appear to be biologically informative categories and evaluations of this hypothesis will facilitate better understanding of the various forms of amphidromy in the future.

    DOI: 10.1007/s11160-013-9316-8

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  • Amphidromy and marine larval phase of ancestral gobioids Rhyacichthys guilberti and Protogobius attiti (Teleostei: Rhyacichthyidae) Reviewed

    H. Tabouret, M. Tomadin, L. Taillebois, M. Iida, C. Lord, C. Pecheyran, P. Keith

    MARINE AND FRESHWATER RESEARCH   65 ( 9 )   776 - 783   2014

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:CSIRO PUBLISHING  

    Even if amphidromous fish species contribute most to the diversity of fish communities in the tropical insular rivers, their biological cycle remain poorly known. For the first time, the otolith elemental composition and microstructure of two ancestral gobioids, Rhyacichthys guilberti and Protogobius attiti, were investigated to describe their biological cycle and pelagic larval duration (PLD). The otolith analysis using a femtosecond laser ablation coupled to an inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (fs-LA-ICP-MS) revealed an amphidromous life history for R. guilberti and it suggested a progressive habitat shift from a marine habitat to a freshwater environment for P. attiti. For the first time, an endemic species, P. attiti, showed longer and more variable PLD (55.2 +/- 13.5 days) than did a widespread one (R. guilberti: similar to 30 days). These results need to be confirmed by analysing more samples but suggest that factors other than the PLD control endemism and dispersal processes. In association with this first description of the biological cycle for both species, such an approach is a prerequisite for the management and conservation of both patrimonial species.

    DOI: 10.1071/MF13146

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  • Unique features of pedicellate attachment of the upper jaw teeth in the adult gobiid fish Sicyopterus japonicus (Teleostei, Gobiidiae): Morphological and structural characteristics and development Reviewed

    Noriyuki Sahara, Keita Moriyama, Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe

    JOURNAL OF MORPHOLOGY   274 ( 5 )   512 - 524   2013.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:WILEY-BLACKWELL  

    Sicyopterus japonicus (Teleostei, Gobiidae), a hill-stream herbivorous gobiid fish, possesses an unusual oral dentition among teleost fishes on account of its feeding habitat. By using scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, including vital staining with tetracycline, we examined the development of the attachment tissues of the upper jaw teeth in this fish. The functional teeth of S. japonicus had an asymmetrical dentine shaft. The dentine shaft attached to the underlying uniquely shaped pedicel by means of two different attachment mechanisms. At the lingual base, collagen fiber bundles connected the dentine shaft with the pedicel (hinged attachment), whereas the labial base articulated with an oval-shaped projection of the pedicel (articulate attachment). The pedicel bases were firmly ankylosed to the crest of the thin flange of porous spongy bone on the premaxillary bone, which afforded a flange-groove system on the labial surface of the premaxillary bone. Developmentally, the pedicel and thin flange of spongy bone were completely different mineralized attachment tissues. The pedicel had a dual origin, i.e., the dental papilla cells, which differentiated into odontoblasts that constructed the internal surface of the pedicel, and the mesenchymal cells, which differentiated into osteoblasts that formed the outer face of the pedicel. A thin flange of spongy bone was deposited on the superficial resorbed labial side of the premaxillary bone proper, and later rapid bone remodeling proceeded toward the pedicel base. These unique features of pedicellate tooth attachment for the upper jaw teeth in the adult S. japonicus are highly modified teeth for enhancing the ability of individual functional teeth to move closely over irregularities in the rock surfaces during the scraping of algae. J. Morphol., 2013. (c) 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

    DOI: 10.1002/jmor.20111

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  • First collection of amphidromous goby post-larvae of Sicyopterus japonicus in the ocean off Shikoku, Japan Reviewed

    Shun Watanabe, Midori Iida, Seishi Hagihara, Hiromitsu Endo, Keiichi Matsuura, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    CYBIUM   35 ( 4 )   371 - 379   2011.12

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    The oceanic early life of Sicydiinae gobies has remained mysterious although considerable knowledge has been accumulated about their freshwater life. Two marine post-larvae of Sicyopterus japonicus. were collected by otter trawl in the ocean off Shikoku. Japan on 18 July and 22 August 2007. These specimens were identified as S. japonicus using meristic characters and the 16S ribosomal RNA mitochondrial gene, which were compared to S. japonicus adults and two other species of Sicydiinae gobies. Morphological observations documented that S. japonicus post-larval characters were the presence of a red pigment at the bases of the second dorsal and caudal fins in fresh samples, as well as the presence of melanophores on the upper jaw, caudal fin base and the lateral body posterior to the anal fin base. Otolith analysis showed that their post-larval durations were 278 and 286 days, and their birth dates were 13 October and 9 November 2006. It is likely that these two post-larvae may have been transported by the Kuroshio Current from the southern part of their geographic species range such as from Okinawa or Taiwan and may have had recruited to a river around Kochi.

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  • Reproductive biology of the amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobiidae: Sicydiinae) Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    CYBIUM   35 ( 4 )   329 - 336   2011.12

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    To understand the reproductive biology of the amphidromous goby, Sicyopterus japonicus, juvenile and adult gobies of this species were sampled in the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan. Sampling was conducted monthly from June 2003 to October 2004, and once each season from April 2005 to March 2006 at 7 sampling stations from the estuary to the upper reaches of the river. The gonadosomatic index values of females (N = 171) ranged from 0.0 to 20.8 and showed high values in July and August (summer, mean: 6.5) that indicated they have a short spawning season. There were no relationships between gonadosomatic index and standard length, age, or distance from the river mouth. This indicated that they do not have a spawning aggregation in a certain area in the river. 30 randomly selected oocytes from each ovary of 48 females were measured to observe the monthly changes of oocyte diameters. "Small oocytes" of 5-100 mu m diameters were observed all year round, while "large oocytes" &gt; 200 mu m were only observed in July and August. Only specimens collected in July and August were classified as being mature by histological examination. Potential batch fecundities calculated by the percentage of large oocytes in the gonads were estimated to be 10,800-52,500 (N = 10), and standard length was correlated with potential batch fecundity. Egg clutches of S. japonicus were observed throughout the sampling sites except in the upper-and lower-most reaches in August 2004 to 2008. Spawning places were found in rapids and egg clutches were attached to the undersides of stones. Although S. japonicus in the Ota River had similar characteristics with tropical Sicychinae species, such as large clutches deposited on the undersurface of the stones, their spawning season was shorter than that of tropical species that have almost year-round spawning.

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  • Plate-like permanent dental laminae of upper jaw dentition in adult gobiid fish, Sicyopterus japonicus Reviewed

    Keita Moriyama, Shun Watanabe, Midori Iida, Noriyuki Sahara

    CELL AND TISSUE RESEARCH   340 ( 1 )   189 - 200   2010.4

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    Sicyopterus japonicus (Teleostei, Gobiidae) possesses a unique upper jaw dentition different from that known for any other teleosts. In the adults, many (up to 30) replacement teeth, from initiation to attachment, are arranged orderly in a semicircular-like strand within a capsule of connective tissue on the labial side of each premaxillary bone. We have applied histological, ultrastructural, and three-dimensional imaging from serial sections to obtain insights into the distribution and morphological features of the dental lamina in the upper jaw dentition of adult S. japonicus. The adult fish has numerous permanent dental laminae, each of which is an infolding of the oral epithelium at the labial side of the functional tooth and forms a thin plate-like structure with a wavy contour. All replacement teeth of a semicircular-like strand are connected to the plate-like dental lamina by the outer dental epithelium and form a tooth family; neighboring tooth families are completely separated from each other. The new tooth germ directly buds off from the ventro-labial margin of the dental lamina, whereas no distinct free end of the dental lamina is present, even adjacent to this region. Cell proliferation concentrated at the ventro-labial margin of the dental lamina suggests that this region is the site for repeated tooth initiation. During tooth development, the replacement tooth migrates along a semicircular-like strand and eventually erupts through the dental lamina into the oral epithelium at the labial side of the functional tooth. This unique thin plate-like permanent dental lamina and the semicircular-like strand of replacement teeth in the upper jaw dentition of adult S. japonicus probably evolved as a dental adaptation related to the rapid replacement of teeth dictated by the specialized feeding habit of this algae-scraping fish.

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  • Validation of otolith daily increments in the amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus Reviewed

    Iida Midori, Watanabe Shun, Tsukamoto Katsumi

    Coastal Marine Science   34 ( 1 )   39 - 41   2010.3

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  • Larval transport of the amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus by the Kuroshio Current Reviewed

    Iida Midori, Zenimoto Kei, Watanabe Shun, Kimura Shingo

    Coastal Marine Science   34 ( 1 )   42 - 46   2010.3

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  • An albino specimen of Sicyopterus japonicus (Tanaka) collected in Taiwan

    WATANABE, S, N-H. JANG-LIAW, C.Y. CHEN, H-M. YEH, B. AI, T. OTAKE, M. IIDA, K.TSUKAMOTO

    NankiSeibutsu   52 ( 1 )   33 - 36   2010

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  • Early life history and description of larval stages of an amphidromous goby, Sicyopterus lagocephalus (Gobioidei: Sicydiinae) Reviewed

    Pierre Valade, Clara Lord, Henri Grondin, Pierre Bosc, Laura Taillebois, Midori Iida, Katsumi Tsukamoto, Philippe Keith

    CYBIUM   33 ( 4 )   309 - 319   2009.12

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    Sicyopterus lagocephalus is an amphidromous fish: adults live in rivers, but after hatching larvae are carried to the sea (dispersion stage). After a certain time spent at sea, post-larvae return to rivers to grow and reproduce. Sicyopterus lagocephalus post-larvae recruiting to Reunion Island rivers (Mascarene Archipelago), provide an important food source to local populations and this fishing activity has a significant socio-economic impact. A better understanding of the early life traits of this species and the characterisation of larval stages should improve the biological and physiological knowledge needed to understand the processes involved in the dispersion stage and help managers to implement conservation measures. In Reunion Island, we characterised the development of larvae from hatching to migration to the sea. The results show that larvae do not undergo any development in freshwater, and that it is the arrival at sea that triggers the morphological transformations. Our results have also revealed that development is quicker when the temperature is high and that development varies according to water depth during the downstream migration. In natural temperature conditions, the maximum survival rate in freshwater is four days. This suggests that when the downstream migration takes too long because of anthropogenic or hydraulic factors, the free embryos would die before they reach the sea.

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  • Morphological characteristics of upper jaw dentition in a gobiid fish (Sicyop- Terus japonicus) A micro-computed tomography study Reviewed

    Keita Moriyama, Shun Watanabe, Midori Iida, Shojiro Fukui, Noriyuki Sahara

    Journal of Oral Biosciences   51 ( 2 )   81 - 90   2009

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)   Publisher:Japanese Association for Oral Biology  

    Using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), scanning electron microscopy, contact microradiography, and light microscopy, we investigated the morphological characteristics of the upper dentition of the gobiid fish Sicyopterus japonicus. Three-dimensional (3-D) micro-CT reconstruction demonstrated many close-set densely packed rows of replacement teeth within the dental sac behind a row of functional teeth located on the labial margin of the premaxillae. Cross-slices of the 3-D micro-CT image revealed that functional teeth and numerous replacement teeth were arranged in a semicircular-like strand. In ground as well as histological cross-sections made in a similar plane as seen in the micro-CT image, each tooth family consisted of about 35 replacement teeth in the fish, ranging in standard length (SL) from 50.8 to 60.5 mm, and a tooth germ was initiated at the most disto-labial end of a tooth family, with the functional tooth situated at the opposite end. Between them, many replacement teeth were arranged in orderly fashion, with each replacement tooth being a little less developed than its proximal neighbor.The present study demonstrates that in the upper jaw dentition of adult S. japonicus, consecutive development of replacement teeth in a tooth family can be monitored simultaneously in the same section by appropriate histological sectioning. These results suggest that the upper jaw dentition of this fish provides a suitable as well as unique system for the study of consecutive development of replacement teeth in adult fish.

    DOI: 10.2330/joralbiosci.51.81

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  • Oceanic dispersal of an amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus: population structure and pelagic larval duration

    Watanabe Shun, Iida Midori, Fukui Shojiro, Takino Shuji, Tsukamoto Katsumi

    NankiSeibutsu   50 ( 2 )   213 - 221   2008.12

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  • Recruitment of the amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus to the estuary of the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan Reviewed

    Midori Iida, Shun Watanabe, Akira Shinoda, Katsumi Tsukamoto

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY OF FISHES   83 ( 3 )   331 - 341   2008.11

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    Ecological aspects of recruitment in the amphidromous goby, Sicyopterus japonicus, were studied from larval collections made with a set net in the estuary of the Ota River, Wakayama, Japan. The abundance patterns of the 12,766 larvae collected from 18 April to 26 August 2006 showed several peaks during the recruitment season. Their body sizes at recruitment ranged from 23.5 to 30.0 mm standard length (mean +/- SD, 26.3 +/- 1.1 mm), 0.11 to 0.49 g body weight (0.22 +/- 0.05 g), and 8 to 20 condition factor (11 +/- 2). The standard length of the goby larvae tended to decrease with the season, while their body weight slightly increased and resulted in an increase in condition factor. The recruitment of larvae occurred mainly during the daytime. Otolith growth increment analysis of 30 larvae collected by a square lift net on 30 April 2005 revealed that the oceanic larval duration after downstream migration ranged from 173 to 253 days (208 +/- 22) after hatching. A limited time of recruitment in early summer and a considerably long duration of oceanic life (about a half year) appeared to be unique characteristics of this Sicyopterus species that lives in a temperate region in comparison to other tropical species of the genus Sicyopterus that all have year-round recruitment.

    DOI: 10.1007/s10641-008-9345-7

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  • Additional comments of rare fishes and the ichthyofauna on Fukui and Mochizuki's "Japanese fishes of Kishu-Kumano: a collection of artworks" (1999)

    Fukui Shojiro, Watanabe Shun, Iida Midori

    Nankiseibutsu   50 ( 1 )   108 - 113   2008.6

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  • Seasonal changes in condition factor of an amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus in three rivers in Nanki area, middle Japan

    Watanabe Shun, Iida Midori, Fukui Shojiro, Takino Shuji, Tsukamoto Katsumi

    NankiSeibutsu   49 ( 2 )   125 - 130   2007.12

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  • Genetic diversity of Sicyopterus japonicus as revealed by mitochondrial DNA sequencing Reviewed

    Watanabe Shun, Iida Midori, Kimura Yobuo, Feunteun Eric, Tsukamoto Katsumi

    Coastal Marine Science   30 ( 2 )   473 - 479   2006

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    To examine the genetic diversity of Sicyopterus japonicus, 448 sites of the control region of the mitochondrial DNA were analyzed in 77 specimens from the four localities of Okinawa, Kochi, Wakayama, and Shizuoka in Japan. A total of 74 haplotypes were found in the individuals examined. The same haplotypes occurred in Okinawa and Kochi, Kochi and Wakayama, and two specimens in Wakayama. The average sequence in genetic characteristics within localities varied from 1.7% in Kochi, 1.6% in Wakayama to 1.4% in Okinawa. There was no significant difference in genetic characteristics among the three locations of Wakayama, Kochi, and Okinawa (10,000 times permutation test, P>0.05). The number of specimens from Shizuoka was too small to compare to the other three locations. The neighbor-joining tree of the mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for all specimens constructed from the Kimura's two-parameter distances suggested no evidence of genetic subdivision of S. japonicus. These results suggested that this species has a single panmictic population and their larvae probably have a high dispersal ability during their oceanic stage.

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Books

  • The Encyclopedia of Ichthyology

    Midori IIDA( Role: Contributor ,  Survival in early life history)

    Maruzen Publishing  2018.10  ( ISBN:9784621303177

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    Language:Japanese Book type:Dictionary, encyclopedia

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  • Indo-Pacific Sicydiine Gobies: Biodiversity, life traits and conservation

    Midori IIDA( Role: Contributor ,  Sicyopterus japonicus)

    Societe Francaise d Ichtyologie  2015 

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  • Studies on early life history of fishes

    Ken MAEDA, Midori IIDA, Masashi KONDO( Role: Contributor ,  Diversity of larval dispersal strategies in freshwater and estuarine gobies)

    Koseisha-Koseikaku  2015  ( ISBN:9784769915706

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  • Challenges for Diadromous Fishes in a Dynamic Global Environment

    Midori IIDA, Shun WATANABE, Katsumi TSUKAMOTO( Role: Contributor ,  Life History Characteristics of a Sicydiinae Goby in Japan, Compared with Its Relatives and Other Amphidromous Fishes)

    American Fisheries Society  2009.8  ( ISBN:9781934874080

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    Total pages:943   Responsible for pages:355–373   Language:English Book type:Scholarly book

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MISC

Presentations

  • Migratory patterns of freshwater fish from Sado Island

    IIDA, M, S. AWATA, T. OGURO, K. KIDO, K. SHIRAI, Y. MITSUO

    Annual Meeting of Ecological Society of Japan  2018.3 

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  • Diadromous migratory pattern of freshwater fish on Sado Island, northern Japan International conference

    IIDA, M, S. AWATA, T. OGURO, K. SHIRAI, Y. MITSUO

    10th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference  2017.10 

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  • Migratory ecology of Sicyopterus japonicus and amphidromy in tropical regions Invited

    Midori IIDA

    he 47th Annual Meeting of the Ichthyological Society of Japan. Symposium, Amphidromy in fishes: its life-history diversification and evolution  2014.11 

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  • Dispersal strategy of larval amphidromous gobies Invited

    Midori IIDA, Masashi KONDO, Ken MAEDA, Katsunori TACHIHARA

    The 2014 autumn meeting of the Japanese Society of Fisheries Science. Symposium, The forefront of early life history in fish  2014.9 

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  • Specific gravity and migratory pattern of two types of amphidromous gobies on Okinawa Island, Japan International conference

    IIDA, M, M. KONDO, H. TABOURET, K. MAEDA, K. TACHIHARA

    9th Indo-Pacific Fish Conference  2013.6 

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  • Recruitment of an amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus in Japan: season, timing and behavior International conference

    IIDA, M, S. WATANABE, K. TSUKAMOTO

    5th World Fisheries Congress: Fisheries for Global Welfare and Environmental Conservation  2009.10 

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  • Seasonal growth patterns of an amphidromous goby Sicyopterus japonicus in the Ota River of Wakayama, Japan International conference

    IIDA, M, S. WATANABE, T. ROBINET, D. BEVACQUA, K. TSUKAMOTO

    8th Indo Pacific Fish Conference  2009.6 

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  • Migration strategy of Sicyopterus japonicus (Gobiidae: Sicydiinae) in Japan International conference

    IIDA, M, S. WATANABE, K. TSUKAMOTO

    Challenges for Diadromous Fishes in a Dynamic Global Environment: 2nd International Scientific Symposium on Diadromous Fishes  2007.6 

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Awards

  • Research Encouraging Prize

    2016   Kitasato University Alumni Association   Research on diversity of migratory ecology of amphidromous gobioid fish

    Midori IIDA

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  • Kitasato Award

    2003.3   Kitasato University  

    Midori IIDA

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Research Projects

  • Evaluating land river and sea connectivity through the ecology of small diadromous fishes

    2019.4 - 2022.3

    Environmental Restoration and Conservation Agency  Environmental Research and Technology Development Fund 

    Yoshito MITSUO

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  • Retrogression of dispersal ability in insular freshwater fish

    2018.4 - 2021.3

    JSPS  KAKENHI Grant (Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)) 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Relationship between coastal and freshwater fish and environment in the Sado Island

    2017.7 - 2018.3

    The Uchida Energy Science Promotion Foundation  Grant for research 

    Midori IIDA

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  • The mechanisms of sustainment of diadromous migration in aquatic organisms

    2017 - 2019

    Inamori Foundation  Research Grant 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Relationship between various riverine environment and fish fauna in Sado Island: diadromous fish as an indicator

    2016 - 2018

    The River Foundation Japan  River Fund 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Aquatic utilisation form of fish in Sado Island

    2016 - 2017

    Sasaki Environmental Technology Foundation  Grant for research 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Freshwater and coastal fish fauna in Sado Island: relationships between aquatic environment and fauna

    2015.7 - 2016.3

    The Uchida Energy Science Promotion Foundation  Grant for energy resource, conservation of natural environment, and measures for disaster 

    Midori IIDA

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    Authorship:Principal investigator  Grant type:Competitive

    Grant amount:\400000 ( Direct Cost: \400000 )

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  • Characteristics of amphidromous gobioid larvae in relation to larval retention and dispersal

    2015.7

    The Japan Science Society  Sasakawa Grants for Science Fellows 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Dispersal and retention mechanisms of planktonic larvae in the coastal area: an example of amphidromous gobies

    2014 - 2016

    Grants-in-aid of The Mikimoto Fund for Marine Ecology 

    Midori IIDA

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    Grant amount:\700000 ( Direct Cost: \700000 )

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  • Origin and evolution of diadromous migration in Gobiidae

    2011.4 - 2014.3

    JSPS  Grant-in-Aid for JSPS Research Fellows 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Amphidromous ecology of Sicyopterus japonicus

    2009 - 2010

    Fujiwara Natural History Foundation  Ito Grant for Ichthyology 

    Midori IIDA

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  • Reproduction, downstream and nearshore migration of Sicyopterus japonicus

    2006 - 2007

    The Japan Science Society  The Sasakawa Scientific Research Grant 

    Midori IIDA

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Teaching Experience

  • 水圏生物環境学特論

    2022
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 理学基礎演習

    2022
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 臨海実習II

    2021
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 水圏生物学

    2021
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 卒業論文Ⅱ

    2020
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 卒業論文

    2020
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 卒業論文Ⅰ

    2020
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 課題研究II(生物学)

    2020
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 水圏生物環境学特論

    2020
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 適応統合生物学

    2020
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 海洋フィールド生物学実習

    2019
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 水圏生態学

    2019
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 水圏生物学

    2019
    -
    2021
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 系統分類学

    2019
    -
    2021
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 課題研究I(生物学)

    2017
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 動物生理学III

    2017
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 生物学総合演習

    2017
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 総合力アクティブ・ラーニング

    2017
    -
    2021
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 系統動物学

    2016
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 生命科学への招待(生物学学習法)

    2016
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 内分泌学演習

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 森・里・海フィールド実習

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 環境生物学野外実習B

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 臨海実習I

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 先端臨海実習

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 海洋生物学実験

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

  • 環境生物学野外実習C

    2015
    Institution name:新潟大学

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Social Activities

  • 海洋生物教室 海府の魚

    Role(s): Lecturer

    佐渡市立内海府中学校  2017.11

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  • 佐渡市理科教育センター「野外(磯の生物)研修会」

    Role(s): Lecturer

    佐渡市理科教育センター  2017.8

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