Updated on 2022/01/27

写真a

 
KOBAYASHI Akira
 
Organization
University Medical and Dental Hospital Perinatal Intensive Care Center Lecturer
Title
Lecturer
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Degree

  • 博士(医学) ( 2018.9   新潟大学 )

Research Areas

  • Life Science / Embryonic medicine and pediatrics

Research History (researchmap)

  • Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital   Medical and Dental Hospital Perinatal Intensive Care Center   Lecturer

    2021.6

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Research History

  • Niigata University   Perinatal Intensive Care Center, University Medical and Dental Hospital   Lecturer

    2021.6

Education

 

Papers

  • Randomized Controlled Trial of High-Flow Nasal Cannula in Preterm Infants After Extubation. International journal

    Atsushi Uchiyama, Kaoru Okazaki, Masatoshi Kondo, Shuntaro Oka, Yukiko Motojima, Fumihiko Namba, Nobuhiko Nagano, Kayo Yoshikawa, Kazunori Kayama, Akira Kobayashi, Yoshiki Soeno, Osamu Numata, Hideyo Suenaga, Ken Imai, Hidehiko Maruyama, Hideshi Fujinaga, Hiroyuki Furuya, Yushi Ito

    Pediatrics   146 ( 6 )   2020.12

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim is to compare the efficacy and safety of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) against those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) or nasal intermittent positive-pressure ventilation (NIPPV) after extubation in preterm infants. METHODS: This prospective, randomized, noninferiority trial was conducted in 6 tertiary NICUs. Infants born at <34 weeks who needed noninvasive ventilation after extubation were enrolled. We randomly assigned infants to an HFNC group when HFNC was used or to an NCPAP/NIPPV group when NCPAP or NIPPV was used. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 7 days after extubation. We then examined clinical aspects of treatment failure with HFNC use. RESULTS: In total, 176 and 196 infants were assigned to the HFNC and NCPAP/NIPPV groups, respectively. The HFNC group showed a significantly higher rate of treatment failure than that of the NCPAP/NIPPV group, with treatment failure occurring in 54 infants (31%) compared with 31 infants (16%) in the NCPAP/NIPPV group (risk difference, 14.9 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, 6.2-23.2). Histologic chorioamnionitis (P = .02), treated patent ductus arteriosus (P = .001), and corrected gestational age at the start of treatment (P = .007) were factors independently related to treatment failure with HFNC use. CONCLUSIONS: We found HFNC revealed a significantly higher rate of treatment failure than NCPAP or NIPPV after extubation in preterm infants. The independent factors associated with treatment failure with HFNC use were histologic chorioamnionitis, treated patent ductus arteriosus, and a younger corrected gestational age at the start of treatment.

    DOI: 10.1542/peds.2020-1101

    PubMed

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  • Thyroid function in asphyxiated newborns who received hypothermia therapy. International journal

    Akira Kobayashi, Touhei Usuda, Masaki Wada, Takayuki Kaneko, Kinuko Kojima, Akihiko Saitoh

    Pediatrics international : official journal of the Japan Pediatric Society   60 ( 5 )   433 - 437   2018.5

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    Language:English   Publishing type:Research paper (scientific journal)  

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid function in asphyxiated newborns who received hypothermia therapy and its relation to neurological outcome are not well described. METHODS: We performed a prospective study to measure thyroid function in 12 asphyxiated newborns who received hypothermia therapy. We measured serum thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free triiodothyronine (FT3), and free thyroxine (FT4) on admission, at 24, 72, and 96 h after birth, and at discharge (range, 17-54 days). The 12 newborns were divided into two groups based on the presence of brain injury on head magnetic resonance imaging (six in the abnormal imaging group and six in the normal imaging group), and thyroid function was compared between the two groups. RESULTS: Serum TSH was within the normal range in the 12 newborns. Serum FT3 and FT4 remained low at 24, 72, and 96 h after birth, and returned to normal range at discharge in the 12 newborns. There was no significant difference in serum TSH between the two groups, but serum FT3 at 96 h after birth, and serum FT4 at 72 and 96 h after birth, were significantly lower in the abnormal imaging group than in the normal imaging group (P = 0.02; P = 0.03; and P = 0.01, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Asphyxiated newborns have transient low thyroid hormone levels at 24-96 h after birth. Serum FT3 and FT4 between 72 and 96 h after birth may predict brain injury in asphyxiated newborns.

    DOI: 10.1111/ped.13534

    PubMed

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